Monthly Archives: February 2016

The Silent Twin by Caroline Mitchell. Published by Bookouture

Twins Abigail and Olivia have their own special form of communication. When Abigail is kidnapped, Olivia stops talking. DC Jennifer Knight is assigned as the FLO to the twins’ family. Right away, Jennifer is troubled by the girls’ mother, who seems way too composed and serene. Their father is obviously terrified and very angry at his wife for her seeming indifference. Jennifer is determined to find the little girl before it’s too late, and she relies on Olivia’s special communication with her twin to find the girl. In a house full of doors that open by themselves and ghostly whispers, Jennifer and her team try to unmask a kidnapper that’s much closer than they realize.

Advertisements

The Devil’s Serenade by Caroline Cavendish. Published by Samhain

Maddie is thrilled when she inherits her aunt’s majestic old home. It needs a lot of work, that’s true, but Maddie has also inherited enough money to get the old place fixed up. As a child, she loved her time there. At least until the summer she was 16. That summer something terrible happened and Maddie had never returned….until now. With the creepy old willow she nicknames Tentacles sending up roots inside the cellar of the house, things start to take a bizarre turn. Things only get worse as the force that threatened Maddie that long ago summer poises to make her part of the house – forever. Shades of Phyllis Whitney in this delightful Gothic tale

The Wolf in the Attic by Paul Kearney. Published by Rebellion

World War I has left much of the world in ruins. Young Greek Anna Francis and her father have fled to Oxford,England, leaving behind their Greek home and the memories of Anna’s dead mother and brother. Anna and her father live alone in a tall, old house where Anna spends her time talking to her doll and spinning stories and elaborate worlds in her imagination. Imagine her surprise to find she’s not alone after all. At the very top of the house, in the attic, she finds a young boy with yellow eyes. His name is Luca and he is just as alone as Anna. A beautifully told fantasy that put me in mind of C.S. Lewis and his travels to Narnia

The Little French Guesthouse by Helen Pollard. Published by Bookouture

Emily Jamieson and her boyfriend Nathan have checked into a sweet little French guesthouse for two weeks to try to reboot their flagging relationship. Nathan’s flag gets hoisted all right, but not by Emily. He takes off with the owner’s older wife. It’s hard to say who’s more shocked, Emily or the poor husband of the tart. Feeling sorry for him (and herself), Emily pitches in to help with the running of the guesthouse. She’s surprised when the local villagers open their arms to her, acting as if she’s one of their own. And the scenery’s not too bad either. There’s a good looking gardener and a smoking hot accountant (who knew accountants could be so sexy?). It’s almost enough to make Emily think about staying on. But she can’t do that. She has a life, friends and family waiting for her back at home, right? A delightful story about love, community, getting over a crappy boyfriend and starting over. Had me snorting with laughter

Paris is Always a Good Idea by Nicholas Barreau. Published by St. Martins

Rosalie Laurent, owner of the Parisian post card shop, Luna, Luna loves her job, but every year on her birthday she makes a “wishing card” and casts it from atop the Eiffel Tower. But year after year, her wildest dreams remain just that…dreams. Until the day a clumsy old man knocks over a display in her shop. The old man turns out to be a celebrated children’s author who becomes enamored of Rosalie’s drawings and asks her to illustrate his next book. Finally, it seems as if Rosalie’s wishes are being granted. Until a grumpy American with some serious allegations shows up on her doorstep anyway…. This is a sweet, frothy story where readers can travel to Paris for macarons at a little cafe on the Seine and take in the sights along the Seine. Escapist fun at its best

Spells of Blood and Kin by Claire Humphrey. Published by St. Martins

When her beloved grandmother, or Baba, dies, 22 year old Lissa has to take over her “position” in the small community where they live. She takes on her grandmother’s burdens including one Maksim Volkov, a man who needs magic, Lissa’s magic to keep him from harming others. He’s already slipped once and allowed his violence to corrupt a formerly unassuming student, Nick Kaisaris. Now Nick is loose in Toronto with forces he does’t understand, tearing him apart. If Maksim doesn’t find Nick, the boy will commit acts of terrible violence and hatred. Maksim is counting on Lissa to help him, because if he can’t find and control Nick, then they will both have to die. This is a thrilling mix of folktales and modern horror that Humphrey manages to make feel all too real

The House of Dreams by Kate Lord Brown. Published by St. Martins

In 1940, a group of artists and intellectuals, refugees from the nightmares of war time France, take shelter in the Villa Air Bel, just outside Marseille.  While an American journalist and others at the American Relief Center work to find a way to get the artists out of France and out of harm’s way, other forces are at work. And things will change for young Gabriel Lambert forever. In 2000, journalist Sophie Cass is looking to make a name for herself. She thinks she’s found it through a family connection to famous painter, Gabriel Lambert. Gabriel has a remarkable story, one he’s never told, one about the real life Cassablanca. This book had me from the introduction,with a quote from my favorite poet, Rupert Brooke. It’s a beautifully imagined story full of heartbreak and impossible choices