Monthly Archives: February 2019

Two Little Girls by Frances Vick. Published by Bookouture

Kirsty has returned to her hometown for the first time in decades. Years before her best friend, Lisa had disappeared and Kirsty provided police with enough information to send a man to jail. She has always wondered if she had an innocent man convicted, and now she’s decided she needs to uncover the truth once and for all. Kirsty is willing to do almost anything to find out what really happened to her friend, never realizing that uncovering the truth may be fatal.

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The Wolf Wants In by Laura McHugh. Published by Spiegel & Grau

Sadie Keller hasn’t moved far away from her hometown of Blackwater, Kansas, just a few miles down the road. She’s still coming to grips with the untimely death of her brother, from what his wife and police say was likely a heart attack. But with no autopsy performed and the suspicious behavior of her sister-in-law, Sadie doesn’t believe her brother-in-law died from natural causes. With little to no help from the local police, Sadie begins her own investigation into her brother’s death. Meanwhile Henley Petit dreams of leaving her seedy hometown forever, but what price will she pay to make that dream come true? With the discovery of human remains in the woods, the price for the truth will cost she and her family more than she can imagine. Told in alternating chapters between Henley and Sadie, this book will hook you from the first page. McHugh is an amazing writer with an ability to make readers see and feel her protagonists fear and grief

Final Betrayal by Patricia Gibney. Published by Bookouture

Detective Lottie Parker has been handed a missing persons case that quickly becomes a double homicide. Amy and Penny disappeared after a night of clubbing at the same time that Conor Dowling, a dangerous man with a hatred of Amy was released from prison. When the bodies are found, there are coins in the hands of both dead girls. The killer is obviously making a statement, but what is it? And while all the evidence points to Dowling as a perpetrator, the man has an alibi. The discovery of two more murdered women has the press and the public screaming for an arrest and while Lottie is desperately searching for answers, her own two daughters disappear. This is the sixth book in this fantastic police procedural series and while the books can be read as standalones, why would you want to miss the first five?

The Weeping Books of Blinney Lane by Drea Damara. Published by BHC

In Salem, Massachusetts, magic and witchcraft are celebrated in the 21st century, and that’s a good thing for Sarah Allister, who owns a bookshop where a highly unusual phenomenon occurs every day. While Sarah looks after her shop and dreams of a romance with a local deliveryman; her nephew, Ricky, with Sarah on summer holiday, begins to look into the mysterious happenings at the shop. This is a fun little magical cozy that will appeal to adults as well as the YA set

Furious Hours by Casey Cep. Published by Knopf

For years there has been speculation about Harper Lee and her literary masterpiece, To Kill a Mockingbird. The fact she never published anything else led many to believe that the book had actually been written by Lee’s good friend, Truman Capote. The release of Go Set a Watchman, the “follow-up” to Mockingbird, after Lee’s death, has done nothing to quite those rumors. Cep takes readers into the little known story of Lee’s attempt to write a true crime novel in the 1970’s. She sat in an Alabama courtroom every day to hear testimony in the trial of a vigilante accused of killing a preacher rumored to have killed his own family for an insurance payout. Lee hoped to pen a book not unlike Capote’s In Cold Blood, but she never did. Cep’s story of the crimes, Harper Lee and the vagaries of the writing muse kept me spellbound. As to the question of who really wrote Mockingbird, I have my opinion and Cep has his. A provocative read that’s part true crime, part biography

One Night Gone by Tara Laskowski. Published by Graydon House

After an ugly divorce, all Allison wants to do is find someplace to rest and nurse her wounds. An offer to house sit a place on the Jersey shore is an offer she can’t refuse, and she soon finds herself obsessed with the story of a girl who disappeared from the town in the 1980’s. Opal Beach, with its beautiful homes and moneyed residents, is far from the safe refuge Allison believed it would be. This book speaks volumes about the power that money and prestige can buy, and the secrets, and bodies, it can bury.

Lock Every Door by Riley Sager. Published by Dutton

Jules Larsen is pretty pleased about her new job as apartment sitter at the posh Bartholomew building, the home of some of Manhattan’s richest and most famous residents. As a lowly sitter, Jules is instructed not to interact with or disturb any of the residents, but she strikes up a friendship with fellow apartment sitter, Ingrid. Ingrid begins to share what she knows about the Bartholomew, and it’s far from comforting. Jules tells herself the stories are just urban legends, until Ingrid disappears and then the stories become all too real. The tension in this story kept me riveted, part ghost story, part thriller, this book should firmly cement Sager as one of the best new thriller writers in the genre